Three Questions

| 0

Welcome to your Three Questions

1. 
What do you like/dislike about the "Three Questions"Module as it relates to supporting your family's needs.
2. 
PRACTICING "Three Questions":
Consider a recent or common behavioral issue with your child. Describe the incident here:
3. 
PRACTICING "Three Questions": Consider Question #1: "What is Behind the Behavior?" Thinking back to the possible reasons that may have led to the behavior, list either what you believe was behind the behavior OR what you think could have attributed to the behavior.
PRACTICING "Three Questions":
Consider Question #1: "What is Behind the Behavior?"
Thinking back to the possible reasons that may have lead to the behavior, list either what you believe was behind the behavior OR what you think could have attributed to the behavior.
4. 

PRACTICING "Three Questions":
Consider Question #2: "What is My Reaction Teaching My Child?"
As always, to support your learning, be honest.  Describe your reaction below taking these questions into account:


How did you react? 
Why did you react that way? 
Was it a positive modeling experience or a negative one?   
If negative, what would you have liked you response to look like? 
What steps will help support your efforts to consistently model a response you'd prefer?

5. 

PRACTICING "Three Questions":
Consider Question #3: "What Do I Want My Child to Learn?"
Take time to consider this answer.  Insight may come from the previous questions: what was behind the behavior, what am I modeling.  It may come from negative habits you'd like your child to improve.  It may even come from core values you'd like to instill or life lessons.   List any responses that support your effort. 

6. 

PRACTICING "Three Questions"  CONSEQUENCES: 
Consider your responses to the previous questions.   Recognizing what is behind the behavior and what you'd like your child to learn from this experience: try to list potential consequences you believe could support your child's personal growth.    

7. 

PRACTICING "Three Questions"  PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: 
If you could revisit this scenario, what would it look like now if you took the three questions into consideration: 

8. 

Use this space for any notes that you'd like to address or consider.



The following questions below are OPTIONAL. 
Feel free to use them to practice "Three Questions" on additional situations or behaviors you'd like to review using this method.




 

9. 
ADDITIONAL PRACTICE: "Three Questions":
Consider a recent or common behavioralissue with your child. Describe the incident here:
10. 
ADDITIONAL PRACTICE:  "Three Questions":
Consider anoother recent or common behavioral issue with your child. Describe the incident here:
11. 
ADDITIONAL PRACTICE:  "Three Questions":
Consider Question #1: "What is Behind the Behavior?"
Thinking back to the possible reasons that may have lead to the behavior, list either what you believe was behind the behavior OR what you think could have attributed to the behavior.
12. 

ADDITIONAL PRACTICE:  "Three Questions":
Consider Question #2: "What is My Reaction Teaching My Child?"
As always, to support your learning, be honest.  Describe your reaction below taking these questions into account:


How did you react? 
Why did you react that way? 
Was it a positive modeling experience or a negative one?   
If negative, what would you have liked you response to look like? 
What steps will help support your efforts to consistently model a response you'd prefer?

13. 

ADDITIONAL PRACTICE:  "Three Questions":
Consider Question #3: "What Do I Want My Child to Learn?"
Take time to consider this answer.  Insight may come from the previous questions: what was behind the behavior, what am I modeling.  It may come from negative habits you'd like your child to improve.  It may even come from core values you'd like to instill or life lessons.   List any responses that support your effort. 

14. 

ADDITIONAL PRACTICE: "Three Questions"  CONSEQUENCES: 
Consider your responses to the previous questions.   Recognizing what is behind the behavior and what you'd like your child to learn from this experience: try to list potential consequences you believe could support your child's personal growth.    

15. 

ADDITIONAL PRACTICE: "Three Questions"  PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER: 
If you could revisit this scenario, what would it look like now if you took the three questions into consideration: 

Your Email
Name

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *